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Have you ever wondered what casement window options were available?

According to wikopedia, The definition of a window is “… an opening in an otherwise solid, opaque surface through which light and air can pass. ” By definition, this includes the early windows which didn’t have any protection from the wind or rain. Early windows used shutters to protect the inside of the house from the elements. Modern windows may have be single, dual, or triple paned.

Styles of Vinyl Replacement Windows

There are may different window styles, those more common today which are usually dictated by the weather conditions common to the area. Coastal climates, with stronger winds, tend to have smaller outward-opening windows while inland areas tend to have larger windows, with commonly open inwards.

* Replacement Windows: is a framed window designed to slip inside the original window frame from the inside after the old sashes are removed

* New Construction Windows: a window with a nailing fin designed to be inserted into a rough opening from the outside before applying siding and inside trim.

Common window styles are:

* Double-hung Sash Window: a Vertical style window with two parts (sashes) which overlap slightly and slide up and down inside the frame.

* Single-hung Sash Window: one sash is movable and the other fixed.

* Horizontal Sliding Sash Window: has two or more sashes that overlap slightly but slide horizontally within the frame. If there are 3 part, the center typically is a fixed panel.

* Casement Windows: An outward-opening window with either side-hung, top-hung, or combination of sash types. Often they have fixed panels on one or more sides of the sash. These are opened using a crank, by friction stays, or espagnolette locking.

* Tilt: a window which can open inwards at the top or can open hinged at the side.

* Jalousie Window: A window comprising many slats of glass that open and close like a Venetian blind usually using a crank.

* Skylight: A flat, sloped, or bubble window built into a roof structure for daylighting.

* Bay Windows: A multipanel window, with at three sections set at different angles to create an expanded area for shelving/sitting while allowing more light into the room that a flat window. The window creates a “seat board”, a small seating area or shelf often used for plants or items that would take up floor space. A bay window may be rectangular, polygonal or arc shaped. If arc-shaped it is a bow window.

* Bow Windows: a type of Bay window, but arc shaped with four or more glass sections to simulate a rounded appearance.

* Fixed: A window that cannot be opened. A non-opening window is sometimes called a “light” because its function is limited to allowing light to enter without any outside air.

* Picture Windows: A very large fixed window in a wall, which provides an unimpeded view “as if framing a picture”.

Classic windows styles:

* Clerestory: A fixed, vertical window set in a roof structure or high in a wall, used for daylighting. You’ll see these in the old churches around the world, like Notre Dame. Clerestory lights are any rows of windows above eye level for providing light.

* Oriel: Projects from the wall, and were originally a form of a porch. Often seen on upper stories of older buildings. Often supported by brackets, or by corbels (a type of architectural bracket), they do not reach the ground. These are the rounded columnar windows you see on older buildings.

* Palladian: A large arched window which is divided into three parts. The center section is larger than the two side sections. Renaissance and classical architecture often have Palladian windows.

Hinged Casement Windows

The Different Types of Home Windows

Many people have been trying to determine which is the better of the two - casement window, or double-hung window? Find out what are their benefits and drawbacks so you can make that comparison.

There are numerous benefits of these windows due to the design of the window. First of all, as it opens at its hinges, it can open widely and fully. This makes it possible to have a full view of the scene beyond the wall, so if you like some privacy yet enjoy being able to view the outside, casement windows make a great choice. Also, you can get more light into the house as well since there is no obstacle in the way when it is wide open. Apart from that, because the window opens wide, wind can easily flow into the house, making the area very well ventilated. Furthermore, the angle of the sash when opened is able to redirect wind to enter the house. Casement windows are also much more airtight than double-hung windows, so it helps to keep a room insulated.

On the other hand, there are a several benefits of double-hung windows too. For one, if the window is located on the ground floor facing a narrow walkway, the fact that it slides up and down instead of open outwards allows people to walk comfortably. Where style is concerned, it is also more versatile in appearance to adapt with most styles. They can also keep the room well-insulated, although not as well as casement windows.

So if considering between the two options, casement windows tend to be a better choice in conserving energy. However, do note that newer models of both windows provide better energy saving features.

Andersen Replacement Casement Windows

Bay and Bow Replacement Windows

If you have a house chances are you have a casement window... or two... or three. These windows make a great choice for any home because they're beautiful, they're functional and they help create great curb appeal.

A casement window is a window that is hinged either on a side or the top and you open it out into the exterior of your home with a crank mechanism. Because it is hand operated, you can choose the amount that you open each window, allowing you to customize the air flow into and out of your home. Too windy? Simply pull the window back in so it doesn't get damaged. Beautiful breeze? Simply open it up all the way to reap all the rewards of the fresh air.

Cleaning casements is easy, you simply open them up, and you can usually get most of both sides from one side of your house. If not, you can always close them and clean the outside from outside and the inside from indoors. Remember that it's a great idea to get a professional window cleaner out at least once a year to give all of your windows a thorough cleaning. Not only will your home sparkle, but the cleaner can give you tips about your windows and let you know of any problems that he or she can see from the outside.