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Have you ever wondered what casement window options were available?

According to wikopedia, The definition of a window is “… an opening in an otherwise solid, opaque surface through which light and air can pass. ” By definition, this includes the early windows which didn’t have any protection from the wind or rain. Early windows used shutters to protect the inside of the house from the elements. Modern windows may have be single, dual, or triple paned.

6 Basic Types of Replacement Windows

There are may different window styles, those more common today which are usually dictated by the weather conditions common to the area. Coastal climates, with stronger winds, tend to have smaller outward-opening windows while inland areas tend to have larger windows, with commonly open inwards.

* Replacement Windows: is a framed window designed to slip inside the original window frame from the inside after the old sashes are removed

* New Construction Windows: a window with a nailing fin designed to be inserted into a rough opening from the outside before applying siding and inside trim.

Common window styles are:

* Double-hung Sash Window: a Vertical style window with two parts (sashes) which overlap slightly and slide up and down inside the frame.

* Single-hung Sash Window: one sash is movable and the other fixed.

* Horizontal Sliding Sash Window: has two or more sashes that overlap slightly but slide horizontally within the frame. If there are 3 part, the center typically is a fixed panel.

* Casement Windows: An outward-opening window with either side-hung, top-hung, or combination of sash types. Often they have fixed panels on one or more sides of the sash. These are opened using a crank, by friction stays, or espagnolette locking.

* Tilt: a window which can open inwards at the top or can open hinged at the side.

* Jalousie Window: A window comprising many slats of glass that open and close like a Venetian blind usually using a crank.

* Skylight: A flat, sloped, or bubble window built into a roof structure for daylighting.

* Bay Windows: A multipanel window, with at three sections set at different angles to create an expanded area for shelving/sitting while allowing more light into the room that a flat window. The window creates a “seat board”, a small seating area or shelf often used for plants or items that would take up floor space. A bay window may be rectangular, polygonal or arc shaped. If arc-shaped it is a bow window.

* Bow Windows: a type of Bay window, but arc shaped with four or more glass sections to simulate a rounded appearance.

* Fixed: A window that cannot be opened. A non-opening window is sometimes called a “light” because its function is limited to allowing light to enter without any outside air.

* Picture Windows: A very large fixed window in a wall, which provides an unimpeded view “as if framing a picture”.

Classic windows styles:

* Clerestory: A fixed, vertical window set in a roof structure or high in a wall, used for daylighting. You’ll see these in the old churches around the world, like Notre Dame. Clerestory lights are any rows of windows above eye level for providing light.

* Oriel: Projects from the wall, and were originally a form of a porch. Often seen on upper stories of older buildings. Often supported by brackets, or by corbels (a type of architectural bracket), they do not reach the ground. These are the rounded columnar windows you see on older buildings.

* Palladian: A large arched window which is divided into three parts. The center section is larger than the two side sections. Renaissance and classical architecture often have Palladian windows.

Bathroom Casement Window

Replacement Windows - What's the Best Type of Vinyl Windows?

If you are renovating your home and considering new replacement windows, you have several great styles to choose from these days, including beautiful casement windows. You know these windows: they're attached to their frames by hinges (usually on the side) and open by way of a crank or a lever (usually at the bottom) that also serves as the window's lock.

Casement windows have been around a long time-as long as poets have been writing about them you could say. But modern casement windows are more than just a thing of beauty. They're a smart choice. In fact, I see a number of terrific benefits to choosing casement windows over other styles:

If You Want an Unobstructed View: Casements make a fabulous choice for rooms that look out over the ocean, lakes, woods, meadows or mountains. Unlike sash windows, all you see is the glass-and your beautiful vista. (Now you know why the poets love them!) You'll want to just sit back and enjoy the view for hours.

If You Like to Fully Open Your Windows: Like the open air? Yes, this window is for you, nature lovers! No other window design opens as wide. As an added bonus, casement windows catch side breezes. Because casement windows sport an open sash that acts as a flap, it can funnel the air into your house. This is a real godsend if your home is close to another house or a building, with very little space between for air to enter directly. And they can be hinged on either the left or the right side to open out, further maximizing on the amount of air you can capture.

The Sounds of Silence: That airtight "snugness" has another benefit: silence. Casements can really keep the noise out, and this is especially true of Andersen's FIBREX windows, a unique patented composite that has the added feature of durability. FIBREX won't rot, even in those salty ocean breezes! So many reasons to take a second look at replacement casement windows for your next home renovation project! Gerry Rogers is the founder and president of Mr. Rogers Windows. He has been selling and installing home improvement products for over 20 years. After introducing his Worry-Free, Lifetime Performance Guarantee, Gerry has earned the trust of thousands of clients by "doing the right thing" to ensure complete satisfaction when it comes to quality products and installation. Visit the Mr. Rogers website to learn more about choosing the right windows for your home and your lifestyle.

30 X 48 Casement Window

Reasons to Use Casement Windows

If you are wondering what makes replacement windows a replacement, these are actually made to be able to fit into an already existing opening that holds a window, which can be easily replaced. If there is a new rough opening that does not have any window in it yet, the appropriate type of window for it would be called a new construction window. Regardless of the types of window, each can be made out of different types of materials like wood, fibreglass, vinyl or aluminium.

The materials that a replacement window is made out of typically differ in how we care and maintain them. Aluminium, vinyl and fibreglass require low maintenance. They can be easily wiped or sprayed clean, and the dirt or dust would easily come off. Plus, they come in a great variety of colours and design, and do not get scratched easily. However, exposed to extreme weathers, aluminium and vinyl can become distorted. Plus, they are not as energy efficient as compared to wood. Wood, on the other hand, requires much more maintenance to keep the wood looking new and polished. Wiping it over time can result in the loss of its finish, and can dull easily under the sun. It can also grow mouldy if not properly cared for where the weather is always wet and humid. However, they are much sturdier than aluminium, vinyl or fibreglass, and give a rustic look to the area.

There are many designs of replacement windows, such as the Double Hung, Casement, Awnings, Hoppers, Picture Window and Rolling Window. Their designs are different in what they function for, where some may allow better ventilation, such as Casement, or is easier to clean, like Double Hung. Nevertheless, there are many replacement window sizes as they would need to be able to fit into the different sizes of opening available. When choosing replacement window sizes, a person will need to choose the smallest measurements to the opening as the guideline to the correct window size, as one can always caulk the additional space that is formed out of imbalanced measurements. Overall, one needs to attain the right measurements and make decisions that will determine the right type of window for your home.