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Have you ever wondered what casement window options were available?

According to wikopedia, The definition of a window is “… an opening in an otherwise solid, opaque surface through which light and air can pass. ” By definition, this includes the early windows which didn’t have any protection from the wind or rain. Early windows used shutters to protect the inside of the house from the elements. Modern windows may have be single, dual, or triple paned.

A Look at Types of Replacement Windows

There are may different window styles, those more common today which are usually dictated by the weather conditions common to the area. Coastal climates, with stronger winds, tend to have smaller outward-opening windows while inland areas tend to have larger windows, with commonly open inwards.

* Replacement Windows: is a framed window designed to slip inside the original window frame from the inside after the old sashes are removed

* New Construction Windows: a window with a nailing fin designed to be inserted into a rough opening from the outside before applying siding and inside trim.

Common window styles are:

* Double-hung Sash Window: a Vertical style window with two parts (sashes) which overlap slightly and slide up and down inside the frame.

* Single-hung Sash Window: one sash is movable and the other fixed.

* Horizontal Sliding Sash Window: has two or more sashes that overlap slightly but slide horizontally within the frame. If there are 3 part, the center typically is a fixed panel.

* Casement Windows: An outward-opening window with either side-hung, top-hung, or combination of sash types. Often they have fixed panels on one or more sides of the sash. These are opened using a crank, by friction stays, or espagnolette locking.

* Tilt: a window which can open inwards at the top or can open hinged at the side.

* Jalousie Window: A window comprising many slats of glass that open and close like a Venetian blind usually using a crank.

* Skylight: A flat, sloped, or bubble window built into a roof structure for daylighting.

* Bay Windows: A multipanel window, with at three sections set at different angles to create an expanded area for shelving/sitting while allowing more light into the room that a flat window. The window creates a “seat board”, a small seating area or shelf often used for plants or items that would take up floor space. A bay window may be rectangular, polygonal or arc shaped. If arc-shaped it is a bow window.

* Bow Windows: a type of Bay window, but arc shaped with four or more glass sections to simulate a rounded appearance.

* Fixed: A window that cannot be opened. A non-opening window is sometimes called a “light” because its function is limited to allowing light to enter without any outside air.

* Picture Windows: A very large fixed window in a wall, which provides an unimpeded view “as if framing a picture”.

Classic windows styles:

* Clerestory: A fixed, vertical window set in a roof structure or high in a wall, used for daylighting. You’ll see these in the old churches around the world, like Notre Dame. Clerestory lights are any rows of windows above eye level for providing light.

* Oriel: Projects from the wall, and were originally a form of a porch. Often seen on upper stories of older buildings. Often supported by brackets, or by corbels (a type of architectural bracket), they do not reach the ground. These are the rounded columnar windows you see on older buildings.

* Palladian: A large arched window which is divided into three parts. The center section is larger than the two side sections. Renaissance and classical architecture often have Palladian windows.

Interior Casement Windows

Casement Window Benefits To Your Home

Casement windows are typically characterised by a window with one or more hinges, attached to a frame. Before the advent of sash windows, they were the most common type of windows used in households. Casements were once the most widely purchased style of windows, before sash windows became commonplace. They traditionally consisted of framed glass panes that were fixed in place by strips of lead and the window could be opened outwards.

Useful Properties

Whole Opening

Casements can be opened much further than any other type, since the entire window can be swung open. This can be compared to the following types of windows.

Double-hung style: the whole window cannot be opened only the upper or lower half can be open at any one time.

Disadvantages

Unsafe

The large window opening can be dangerous at high levels, since the gap is typically sufficient for small person or child to crawl out of and therefore poses a risk for families with young children.

Incompatibility with Air Conditioning

Casements typically do not cater well for air-conditioning units since they open outwards, especially when compared to other types such as sliding windows.

Size Limitations

Casements are designed to open outwards which means the opening needs to be strong enough to support the window. This places limits on how large a casement can be without placing unnecessary strain on the window opening.

Casement Window Crank Assembly

What to Expect With Casement Windows

Whether you're replacing current windows or focusing on a new building project, the decision of whether to include wood or maybe vinyl casement windows in your house can be a difficult one. Which type of window to install depends on your current price range, preferences and circumstance. The following comparing of vinyl and wooden casement windows may be helpful in making your choice.

Important things about wooden casement windows:
Many homeowners and constructors suggest wooden casement windows more than vinyl ones. They provide a variety of advantages over vinyl windows over the long term. Based on the original cost is the fact that wooden can dramatically raise a house's resale value, while vinyl typically don't. This has to do with the belief that wooden windows typically enjoy a much longer functional lifespan as compared to vinyl ones, which sometimes warp and also require replacement or maintenance work after just a few years.

Vinyl windows usually include tight joints that are great at maintaining heat range levels and never allowing for transference of high temperature between the inside your home and outdoors. Wooden windows have a very wider range of stability in this sense, and several wooden windows really do a worse job of keeping heat plus maintaining heat than vinyl.